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NEWS | Feb. 23, 2021

Black History Month an Opportunity to Highlight Diversity of Talent

By (Courtesy article) 3d Medical Command (Deployment Support)

In recognition of Black History Month, it’s an opportunity to look at the diversity of talent and skills that can only be found in the Army Reserve and 3d Medical Command (Deployment Support).

Based in the Atlanta area, the 3d MC(DS) is right in the middle of Georgia and its $10 billion dollar film and television industry. Although the 3d MC(DS) mission is to provide world-class military medicine, it shouldn’t be surprising to have a TPU Soldier involved in the film industry.

Maj. Satomi Mack-Martin, is a 36A Finance Officer, working in the 3d MC(DS) Public Affairs section. In her civilian capacity, she writes and directs content for video production companies and small businesses.

Mack-Martin brings a passion for respect and selfless service to both her civilian and military projects. As a graduate with a Master of Fine Arts in Film & TV Productions from University of Southern California, School of Cinematic Arts, she brings a special eye for collaboration and creativity that benefits the Army Reserve.

“One of my professors at USC pointed out to me that I ‘Have a finger on the pulse of life’. The Army Reserve is what helped set me apart from my peers,” said, Satomi Mack-Martin.  

“I love creating content for the Army Reserve. Working in public affairs aligns my passion for filmmaking with my military duty. I feel blessed and fortunate to be able to use my civilian skills in telling the best Army Reserve story that I can,” said, Mack-Martin.

Mack-Martin’s work varies from hosting mini productions in Saddam Hussein’s palace theater for deployed Soldiers in Iraq, to Army Reserve Marketing commercials highlighting why, both medical and non-medical, Army Reserve Soldiers serve. In addition, she produced multiple COVID-19 videos of 3d MC(DS) Urban Augmentation Military Task Force teams, highlighting the Soldiers passionate and personal stories of support.

This same drive carries through in her personal work where she worked on projects that reflect her passion. Mack-Martin was 1st Assistant Director on the 2020 movie Miss Juneteenth, which premiered at Sundance and nominated for multiple film awards, including the upcoming 52nd NAACP Image and Independent Spirit Awards.

Responding to the ravaging, but less spotlighted aspects of COVID, Mack-Martin directed a PSA on making mental health awareness a priority in the Black community, where she worked alongside celebrity actors, filming their segments from home.

Working with people with different personalities can present various challenges, however, Mack-Martin relishes in these challenges, saying, “Through leadership training in the Army Reserve, I’ve learned to connect with people better and find ways to inspire them individually.”

COVID may have limited the overall exposure of her work, but hasn’t deterred her focus, “If 2020 has taught me anything, it reassured discipline for me. I currently homeschool my two children; two and six years old. I had to find a way to remain productive and creative last year despite all that was going on. On most days, I wake up around 4 a.m. to pray and meditate, work out, and begin a 2-hour writing session before my family awakes for the day,” Mack-Martin said.